1.1 Physical Quantities and SI Units

This section covers the following syllabus (Physics 5059) requirements.

  • show understanding that all physical quantities consist of a numerical magnitude and a unit
  • recall the following base quantities and their units: mass (kg), length (m), time (s), current (A), temperature (K), amount of substance (mol)
  • use the following prefixes and their symbols to indicate decimal sub-multiples and multiples of the SI units: nano (n), micro (μ), milli (m), centi (c), deci (d), kilo (k), mega (M), giga (G)
  • show an understanding of the orders of magnitude of the sizes of common objects ranging from a typical atom to the Earth
  • state what is meant by scalar and vector quantities and give common examples of each
Show understanding that all physical quantities consist of a numerical magnitude and a unit. Recall the following base quantities and their units: mass (kg), length (m), time (s), current (A), temperature (K), amount of substance (mol).
Use the following prefixes and their symbols to indicate decimal sub-multiples and multiples of the SI units: nano (n), micro (μ), milli (m), centi (c), deci (d), kilo (k), mega (M), giga (G). Show an understanding of the orders of magnitude of the sizes of common objects ranging from a typical atom to the Earth

2.2 Basic Kinematics Graphs

This section covers the following syllabus (Physics 5059) requirements.

  •   plot and interpret a displacement-time graph and a velocity-time graph
  • deduce from the shape of a displacement-time graph when a body is:

                    (i)        at rest

                   (ii)        moving with uniform velocity

                  (iii)        moving with non-uniform velocity

  •  deduce from the shape of a velocity-time graph when a body is:

                    (i)        at rest

                   (ii)        moving with uniform velocity

                  (iii)        moving with uniform acceleration

                 (iv)        moving with non-uniform acceleration

  • calculate the area under a velocity-time graph to determine the displacement travelled for motion with uniform velocity or uniform acceleration
Plot and interpret a displacement-time graph and a velocity-time graph. Deduce from the shape of a displacement-time graph when a body is at rest, moving with uniform velocity or moving with non-uniform velocity. Deduce from the shape of a velocity-time graph when a body is at rest, moving with uniform velocity, moving with uniform acceleration or moving with non-uniform acceleration. Calculate the area under a velocity-time graph to determine the displacement travelled for motion with uniform velocity or uniform acceleration.

3.3 Newton’s Laws of Motion

This section covers the following syllabus (Physics 5059) requirements.

  •   apply Newton's Laws to:

(i) describe the effect of balanced and unbalanced forces on a body

(ii) describe the ways in which a force may change the motion of a body

(iii) identify action-reaction pairs acting on two interacting bodies

(stating of Newton's Laws is not required)

  •  recall and apply the relationship resultant force = mass × acceleration to new situations or to solve related problems
Apply Newton's Laws to describe the effect of balanced and unbalanced forces on a body, describe the ways in which a force may change the motion of a body. Recall and apply the relationship resultant force = mass × acceleration to new situations or to solve related problems
Identify action-reaction pairs acting on two interacting bodies. 

4.1 Mass and Weight

This section covers the following syllabus (Physics 5059) requirements.

  •  state that mass is a measure of the amount of substance in a body
  • state that mass of a body resists a change in the state of rest or motion of the body (inertia)
  • state that a gravitational field is a region in which a mass experiences a force due to gravitational attraction
  • define gravitational field strength, g, as gravitational force per unit mass
 State that mass is a measure of the amount of substance in a body. State that mass of a body resists a change in the state of rest or motion of the body (inertia). State that a gravitational field is a region in which a mass experiences a force due to gravitational attraction. Define gravitational field strength, g, as gravitational force per unit mass

6.1 Energy and its Different Forms

This section covers the following syllabus (Physics 5059) requirements.

  • show understanding that kinetic energy, potential energy (chemical, gravitational, elastic), light energy, thermal energy, electrical energy and nuclear energy are examples of different forms of energy
  • state that kinetic energy Ek = ½ mv2 and gravitational potential energy Ep = mgh (for potential energy changes near the Earth’s surface)
Show understanding that kinetic energy, potential energy (chemical, gravitational, elastic), light energy, thermal energy, electrical energy and nuclear energy are examples of different forms of energy. State that kinetic energy Ek = ½ mv2 and gravitational potential energy Ep = mgh (for potential energy changes near the Earth’s surface)